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Declaration of Emergency
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Salt Lake County issues Declaration of Emergency

A sub-compact car was compacted more after high winds brought down a spruce tree onto the street in South Salt Lake. Photo: Marc Giauque, KSL NewsRadio

SALT LAKE CITY  — Salt Lake County Mayor Jenny Wilson has signed a Declaration of Emergency in response to the arctic windstorm that swept through the county on Tuesday. The high-powered winds caused widespread damage throughout the county and left thousands without power. 

Mayor Wilson authorized the state of emergency on Wednesday, invoking the ability to help those adversely affected by the hurricane-level winds. The decision to issue a state of emergency came after officials surveyed the extent of the damage, the need for resources, and the cost of recovery from the storm. 

In a response statement, the county said the declaration “provides avenues for municipalities and counties to receive financial and material resources from the state or federal government.”

Windstorm damage in Salt Lake County

As of Wednesday, 239 residents have reported damage from the storm, and 65 of those consider the damage as major. 

The county has set up a Damage Assessment Survey for residents to self-report damage. The data collected will help the county and cities coordinate resources and clean-up efforts. 

On Wednesday afternoon Rocky Mountian Power (RMP) reported 74,485 customers were without power in Salt Lake County.  RMP is working around the clock to restore services. But the company said it could take up to 72 hours for some areas to regain power.

The areas most affected include the city of Millcreek, the Avenues in Salt Lake City, the northeast section of Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Murray, Holladay, and northern portions of Taylorsville. 

 

Heavy debris is another concern for the county. Branches, toppled trees, power lines, and road signs have littered the streets throughout the county. Salt Lake County Public Works has been working to clean up debris to provide safe driving conditions.

Additionally, county officials are working to restore stoplights. The aftermath of the storm left 39 intersections without power, 11 are currently operating via generators. 

Salt Lake Valley landfill 

Until September 23, all weather-related green waste and broken fence disposal will be free of charge. Residents cleaning up debris can drop off their green waste at Salt Lake Valley Landfill at 6030 West California Avenue. The fee waiver is intended to address the need for green waste disposal by residential and non-commercial entities affected by the storm.  Grass clippings and regular “junk” removal is not included. 

The landfill will be open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, contact the Salt Lake Valley Landfill at 385-468-6370.