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Hundreds of motorcyclists join military members to improve safety

HILL AIR FORCE BASE — Officials at Hill Air Force Base estimate a couple hundred riders came to their eighth annual “See Me, Save Me” safety ride.

Whenever motorcycle riders hear about a crash involving a motorcycle, many of them think, “That could have been me.”  Rider Mike Quercia says his worst crash was in Hawaii when a woman ran a red light.  He says, “I nailed her right in the left, front fender and flew over the top of the car.”  He landed on his hands and knees, and, on cold days, you can still see the gravel marks on his hands.

Rider Mike Quercia says his worst crash was in Hawaii when a woman ran a red light.  He says, “I nailed her right in the left, front fender and flew over the top of the car.”  He landed on his hands and knees, and, on cold days, you can still see the gravel marks on his hands.

He says, “I nailed her right in the left, front fender and flew over the top of the car.”

He landed on his hands and knees, and, on cold days, you can still see the gravel marks on his hands.

Motorcycle safety is a required course on Hill Air Force Base.  Instructors say many military members come back from active service and are still looking for an adrenaline high.  Safety Coach Terry Damner says a lot of them buy powerful motorcycles and need to be taught how to operate them safely.

As for why other drivers can’t see motorcycles, Damner says he can’t explain it.  He recalls a near crash he had just the other week when a man in a large pick-up pulled in front of him.  “He stops right in front of me and comes to a dead stop.  Thank goodness for anti-lock brakes on this motorcycle.  But, I got stopped and he looked at me and did the shoulder shrug thing.  So, he wasn’t looking at me.  He was looking through me,” he explains.

“He stops right in front of me and comes to a dead stop.  Thank goodness for anti-lock brakes on this motorcycle.  But, I got stopped and he looked at me and did the shoulder shrug thing.  So, he wasn’t looking at me.  He was looking through me,” he explains.

Damner says that’s why they like to have as many riders as they can come to an event like this.

“We want as many people to see us as we can, just to let them know that we’re out there.”