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COVID-19 deaths in Utah rise to 27 with 679 cases considered recovered
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COVID-19 deaths in Utah rise to 27 with 679 cases considered recovered

SALT LAKE CITY — Two more COVID-19 deaths reported in Utah on Sunday brings the total to 27.

Both reported COVID-19 deaths are SLCO residents, one male, and one female. They were both older than 85 years old and were hospitalized at the time of their death but had been living in a long-term care facility with underlying medical conditions before their deaths.

The update today comes with new numbers across the board including an estimate on those who have recovered. Cases that are considered recovered are those with a diagnosis date of more than three weeks ago who has not passed away.

Utah COVID-19 Current Numbers as of April, 19

According to new numbers released Sunday by the Utah Department of Health, Utah now has:

  • 3,069 lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19
  • 63,555 tests performed
  • 259 COVID-19 hospitalizations
  • 27 deaths related to COVID-19
  • 679 cases considered “recovered”

How To Prevent the Spread of COVID-19 Coronavirus  

COVID-19 coronavirus is transmitted from person to person. It is a virus that is similar to the common cold and the flu. So, to prevent it from spreading: 

  • Wash hands frequently and thoroughly, with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds.  
  • Don’t touch your face. 
  • Keep children and those with compromised immune systems away from someone who is coughing or sneezing (in this instance, at least six feet) 
  • If there is an outbreak near you, practice social distancing (stay at home, instead of going to the movies, sports events, or other activities.) 
  • Get a flu shot. 

Resources for more information: 

 

LOCAL: 

State of Utah:  https://coronavirus.utah.gov/ 

Utah State Board of Education 

Utah Hospital Association 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

Utah Coronavirus Information Line – 1-800-456-7707 

National Links 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Commonly asked questions, World Health Organization 

Cases in the United States